Casting Call

Recently when I was sharing some images of Pierce Brosnan from my friend Vonda McIntyre‘s movie [okay, her book is being released as a movie this summer, so in my world, it’s her movie!]…

 

The King’s Chapel

A photo posted by Keely Shaye (@keelyshayebrosnan) on

Somebody said, “That’s my Apollo Fury!”

And you know what? I like it.

Framed in the open doorway, stood her parents. Surely too young and vibrant, many had said, to have such a passel of children—over half that had reached their majority! But her father’s hair was as black as the day he’d married. Her mother’s softer brown, while too weak to influence a single lock on her children’s heads, showed no silver, her face no lines.

They entered the room with an elegance that might be mistaken for hauteur, had their expressions not been so gracious. Her father’s half smirk and occasional nod seemed merely to say, ‘You have us; we have returned; I hope you are satisfied for this won’t happen again soon,’ while her mother’s smile managed to be both warm and mysterious. If anyone present had thought the Furys’ sudden return to Society was that of prodigals, they now must see the truth.

The Furys were gracing them with their presence.

Now, who would be Persephone’s mother…?

If you ‘see’ certain people as characters in the Fury Triad, or do fan art and have created your own, fplease share. I love knowing what the characters look like in your imagination!

Cross-posted at furytriad.

Harvest Monday – Jan 19

Long time no see!

I haven’t been posting and usually not taking pictures, but I have a question today.

First–after a hard freeze two weeks ago I went and pulled up all our carrots, which ended up in an Irish stew. OMG so good.  Not a lot of carrots but enough for that stew, and I will be planting more. I also harvested a few purple kale leaves. They were delicious, too! And I do have a pic of them.

purple kaleMy question. I have started seedlings and the first batch, I didn’t have the light close enough. Are these too leggy? Should I just start over? I don’t even remember what they are!

leggy seedlings

I’ll be posting more about seedlings when I have time!

Still growing!

Six Degrees of Separation from Kindred Rites

This is a meme I saw on GirlXOXO and it just looked like too much fun not to join in.

Last Book of 2014

 

Vampires and werewolves and worse, oh my!

Vampires and werewolves and worse, oh my!

As she did, I’m going to begin with the last book I read in 2014, Kindred Rites, by Katharine E Kimbriel (second in a series, a five star read, by the way). The first book in the series, Night Calls, is also amazing. I can’t wait to read the next one, Spiral Path which is already on my Kindle, waiting. This series is set in a slightly alternate early United States under President Madison, which includes the early settlers bringing the magics and traditions from their Old Worlds with them. Awesome stuff.

 

Last Book of 2013

 

AR_BetweenTwoThorns-400x600Okay, so that made me curious. What was the last book I read in 2013? Thanks to Goodreads, I could look and see, and discover that I’d just discovered another magical series, urban fantasy with a twist, Emma Newman’s Split Worlds. In the first book, Between Two Thorns, we learn that alongside the London and Bath we know are magical, parallel worlds that include the cities Londinium and Aquae Sulis. The characters are amazing, the magic frightening and scintillating, and the world too much fun. I inhaled these one after the other.

 

Another Urban Fantasy Series I Love

 

Rivers of LondonI used to say I didn’t read Urban Fantasy, but that’s because I didn’t know what it was, and more importantly, hadn’t discovered urban fantasy set in the UK. So yes, every urban fantasy series I love is set in the UK, surprise, surprise. I suppose the next book I’ll mention is the unfortunately renamed Midnight Riot, originally titled Rivers of London. I hope you don’t mind that I’m using that book cover, because it’s the edition I bought for my own keeper shelf. I love young copper Peter Grant, whose father is an aging, heroin-addicted jazz musician and mum is a magnificent housekeeper from Sierra Leone. This London is different from most Londons you’ve probably read about, for in addition to his erudite superior Nightingale, Peter’s personal life and assignments take us with him through the various areas of London that tourists never see, and encompass the broad range of cultures that make up today’s UK. These books are fun, smart and a trip to Old Blighty, every time I pick one up.

 

Books with Protagonists Named Peter

 

200px-DorothyLSayers_MuderMustAdvertiseOh my darlings, how could it be any other but Lord Peter Wimsey? But which one to put here? Okay, let’s go with Murder Must Advertise, which shines as jaded a light on the advertising business in 1933 when it was written as we see in Mad Men’s mid-century world and today’s. Some things never change, and I’m not just talking about the setting of this book, but the amazing Lord Peter, who is still winning hearts and souls today, just as he did when he was first penned by Dorothy L Sayers.

 

Anglican Authors

 

a_wrinkle_in_time_original_coverDorothy L Sayers not only wrote crime fiction, she also wrote theological works and translations.   Another beloved novelist, this one an American who was also known  for her theological works and was also an Anglican (Episcopalian) was Madeleine L’Engle. I first read A Wrinkle in Time when I was a girl, but The Arm of a Starfish caught me up even more vividly. I remember being at home sick and my father bringing home a stack of library books for me that included Meet the Austins. I guess I scattershot all around her oeuvre before I went back and made a concerted effort to read them all.

Books with Time in the Title

 

time gardenAnother blast from my past, Edward Eager’s works are the first series of books about magic I ever read, The Time Garden. This wasn’t the first book in the series I read, and in fact is probably read better later since this book about time travel has the children traveling back in time to meet children we first read about in the earlier books. But I thought it was oh-so-clever, when they found a thyme garden and discovered that there were many different kinds of thyme, and each on in this garden would take them on a different kind of adventure in time. This is probably the reason why I love planting various thymes in my own garden today, truth to tell! If you want to start earlier, though, try Half-Magic.

 Books About Siblings

 

ThePrinceOfTidesBrace yourself for whiplash. When it comes to books about families, few rival Prince of Tides for angst, drama, laugh-out-loud humor, and revelation. I own an autographed copy of this book in hardcover, and to this day Pat Conroy is the most gracious author I’ve ever met. Mind you, this isn’t a mark of what miserable bastids most writers are, but what a superlative gentleman he is.  As for his writing, he will take you on an emotional roller coaster ride of Southern dysfunction that you won’t forget.

Books Set on the Coast

 

montmarayNot the American coast of South Carolina, this time, but off the coast of France, a tiny imaginary nation where the only people left are a handful of royals and their handful or servants. In A Brief History of Montmaray the royals live in a tumbling down castle, totally destitute, and Sophie our main character even does chores, despite their cook’s efforts to keep the family in their exalted place.  This is the first book in a trilogy, and I loved it, and the later books.

This was hella fun!

Why don’t you do it, too? Let me know if you do!

WWW Wednesday Dec 24, 2014

Snagged this meme from shouldbereading.

It is Christmas Eve and I am gifting you, my darlings. Gifting you. Flinging gifts at you with gay abandon.

You see, I’m reading wonderful tales right now. I have recently read fabulous tales. I am posting only wonderful, fabulous reads and if any sound your cuppa, go to the nearest library or bookstore and get them.

You won’t be sorry.

To play along, just answer the following three (3) questions…

• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?

 

What are you currently reading?

The loveliest cover I found.

The loveliest cover I found.

I am currently listening to the first book in Eloisa James’s “Desperate Duchesses” series, aptly titled, Desperate Duchesses. How do I keep forgetting what a fabulous writer she is? I have so many of her books that I haven’t read, and each time I read one it seems as if I am astounded and delighted anew.

I read the second book in the series first, finishing it last night. It is in the next section. I stayed up late because I had see how it ended. And upon finishing it, I promptly went to Audible and downloaded the first in the series, because I knew in the next few days I’d be more likely to have listening time while I’m puttering around the house than sitting time for lingering over a delicious story with a hot cup of tea.

But I’m totally enjoying this [late] introduction to the world of desperate duchesses.

Vampires and werewolves and worse, oh my!

Vampires and werewolves and worse, oh my!

 

On my Kindle, when I do have those delicious free moments, I have submerged again into Katherine Eliska Kimbriel’s “Allie” books. Just as in Eloisa James, I find myself unable to explain why I didn’t dive into the second book sooner after loving the first with a five-star love.

Returning to this alternate history is like returning to the hearth of a friend, complete with the chills of knowing that outside those cabin walls lurk vampires and werewolves and more, oh my. Kindred Rites, you had me at Chapter One!

I had the delight of sharing a room with Katharine at LoneStarCon in 2013 and experienced the many people who were approaching her wanting to know when a new Allie book was coming, even though it had been many years since the first two were published. Now I understand why, after years, people still remember and want more, and then more.

• What did you recently finish reading?

Wonderful any time of year.

Wonderful any time of year.

As I mentioned above, I just finished a book that made me laugh, even made me choke up with tears, a book that was both delightfully romantic and sexy while being true to the social and sexual mores of the time, in ways sometimes brutally honest.

An Affair Before Christmas is a delight at any time of year. It’s not heavy on the Christmas vibe, since it only ends at Christmas, and yet, what a lovely Christmas ending. (happy sigh)

Eloisa James knows her time periods, and well she should. In this particular book I started off disliking the heroine, even at first thinking she wasn’t really the heroine, but the ‘mistake’ the hero made before finding the real one. And when I finally understood the reason for her ‘issues’ I was sympathetic and thought, yes, this is totally believable for this time period, but was also uneasy by how extreme her situation was, and wondering how on earth James was going to get her past it without a hand-wave romantic trope.

Then my jaw dropped.

Enough said.

Read it. You’ll be glad you did.

foxglove summer

My copy is much greener and quite bright.

And this is where I get to dance the nyah-nyah, I’ve read it and you haven’t dance, because I am so mature like that, because I sprang for the exchange rate plus shipping to get my hardcover copy of Foxglove Summer without waiting for its January 6 American publication date.

These books just keep getting better and better. After the cliffhanger ending of the previous book, I am not sure what I was expecting, but for the first time Peter Grant left London and followed his nose and boredom into the wilds of Herefordshire.

Herefordshire is a place I already know and love from the amazing and plentiful Merrily Watkins series. Going there and seeing it through cheeky Peter’s point of view was a delight. This is the first real paper and binding book I’ve read in months, other than research materials. I loved every word of the experience and now am eyeing the other books in the series, considering ordering them in hardcover from the UK, as well.

Building a library of books I love can be expensive, but since I started reading on Kindle I have stopped buying real books unless they are for research (so I can mutilate with highlighters and marginalia) or keepers, and when the keepers were originally published in the UK, I do prefer UK editions.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

I have no freaking idea.

By the way, I had some lovely news this week!

PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT with either the link to your own WWW Wednesdays post, or share your answers in a comment here (if you don’t have a blog). Thanks!

Cross-posted at Book View Café.

WWW Wednesday 12-3-2014

Snagged this meme from shouldbereading:

 

 

To play along, just answer the following three (3) questions…

• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?

 

What are you currently reading?

prayer of night shepherdI am currently listening to the 6th book in Phil Rickman’s Merrily Watkins series. I read it previously, and this is my second time to listen. They are something like mysteries with a hefty dose of horror or paranormal, much discussion of religion, and hit so many of my buttons that this is my second time through the 12-book (so far) series. I seem to have bought all the books in digital and audio, both. I like them that much. Merrily Watkins is a vicar, one of the Church of England’s first female priests, who (in the second book in the series) is appointed deliverance consultant for the Diocese of Hereford, aka, diocesan exorcist. She isn’t even sure what she thinks about the paranormal aspects of this job, but like Agent Scully, usually winds up in situations that make it hard not to believe. I love her teenaged daughter, the guy who later becomes her love interest, and various supporting members of the cast. Each book involves another historical oddity from a village or town in the borders of England and Wales. For an Anglophile like me, these books are my catnip. Surely I’m not the only one?

• What did you recently finish reading?

Think of EnglandYou mean other than books 1-thru-5 in the Merrily Watkins series? I recently read Think of England, a m/m romance set in pre-WWI England. I saw the book first mentioned on Dear Author and am glad I followed the crowd and read it. Industrial espionage, spies, tragedy and betrayal, oh and did I mention romance?

From Goodreads: Warning: Contains explicit male/male encounters, ghastly historical attitudes, and some extremely stiff upper lips.

The anti-Jewish sentiment is definitely triggery for some readers, so it’s a fair warning but there is never any indication that the bigotry is acceptable. Daniel, the Jewish character, is terrific and I found the love story to be tense and compelling. I do hope this is the first of a series, although it stands alone quite well. I’d like to see how these two guys make things work in a society that is against them. But since this author has apparently written other series, maybe it’s not too far off the mark to anticipate more here.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

StrangerI have a couple of books high on my to-be-read list, both by BVC authors.

I’ve been wanting to read Stranger, by Sherwood Smith and Rachel Manija Brown, ever since it hit the news a year or two ago. And it’s out! I love Sherwood’s work, but this is the first I will have read of Rachel’s. I’m particularly interested in the cultural diversity in the book, and of course, any tale that has an ancient book as a treasured artifact and central device of power intrigues me.

Kindred RitesWhen I finally read ‘the first Allie book,’ Night Calls, by Katherine Eliska Kimbriel, I totally fell in love with the world and characters. Next up, Kindred Rites, the second book in the series.

I can’t wait to dive back into the alternate American history of the early 1800s western frontier, complete with werewolves and vampires and magic, oh my! Now I understand why people fell in love with these books when they were first published, and have waited so patiently for sequels. Luckily, Kathi has written the third in the series with more planned, so none of us will have to wait so long for more of Allie’s adventures.

 

 

PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT with either the link to your own WWW Wednesdays post, or share your answers in a comment here (if you don’t have a blog). Thanks!

Cross-posted at Book View Café.

Today Only Sale ~ This Crumbling Pageant!

Cyber-Monday Madness! I’m part of Kobo’s 35% off today-only insanity.

Want a copy of This Crumbling Pageant at this great price? Use this coupon code: CYBERMONDAY35

PatriciaBurroughs_ThisCrumblingPageant_800px

Grab it while it’s on sale today! Use this coupon code at checkout: CYBERMONDAY35

And while you’re there, check out the other one-day sales!

 

WWW Wednesday – 11-12-2014

WWW Wednesday. This meme is from shouldbereading.

To play along, just answer the following three (3) questions…

• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?

• What are you currently reading?

The-Forgotten-Sister-cover1The Forgotten Sister: Mary Bennet’s Pride and Prejudice, by Jennifer Paynter.

I just started listening to this audiobook last night, and I have to admit, it’s starting off better than I expected. I was offered a special price on it, so low I couldn’t refuse. I’m not sure if that’s through some audible-member algorithms, or if it’s cheap for everybody, so check it out if you’re interested. $1.99.

The opening chapters give background on what was happening between Mr and Mrs Bennet during those early years when she kept popping out daughter after daughter, and it was more compelling than I anticipated.

:izzie doesn’t come off all that great here, but why would she, when viewed through Mary’s eyes? And Lydia, omg, Lydia. Well, nothing surprising there!

Looking forward to more.

 

• What did you recently finish reading?

All Who Are Lost ForrestAll Who Are Lost by Lindsey Forrest grabbed me and subtly pulled me in until I couldn’t stop turning pages until I finally got to the end.

This is the first of a trilogy, Ashmore’s Folly Trilogy. I think it’s unusual for women’s fiction to be presented as a trilogy, but these are long books individually so it’s definitely not an effort to pad sales. Instead, it’s a sweeping soap opera of a tale with four stories of grand passion tangled into a compelling whole.

“Here’s a monk, sworn to chastity, devoted to God, and it took your mother one evening and all she had to do was flutter her eyes at him and off he went.

Dominic, the domineering ex-monk and brilliant composer/director, had three illegitimate daughters with the operatic diva who swept him into her wake, plus a daughter with their nanny.  When the diva drowned in the Irish Sea, most agreed Dominic got away with murder. And from this background springs the four sisters whose lives are forever marked by the father who was determined to create a new operatic genius to control, ‘control’ being the significant word there.

Five stars for women’s fiction that sinks your teeth in and doesn’t let go!

• What do you think you’ll read next?

I don’t know! I have many books I want to read but can’t even guess what will suit me when it’s time to open the next!

What about you? What have you been reading lately? Put the link to your WWW Wednesday entry in comments, or just tell us!

~oOo~